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Our History

Making Us Who We are Today

Did You Know?
The City of Baldwyn

The City of Baldwyn has been part of four counties.  Located fives miles north of Guntown, the main street of Baldwyn runs along the county line of Lee and Prentiss counties.  The city has the unusual distinction of having been incorporated in four counties.  It was incorporated by an Act of the Legislature in Tishomingo and Itawamba counties on April 1, 1861.  Tishomingo County was divided into Alcorn, Prentiss and Tishomingo in 1870, while Lee was formed from parts of Itawamba and Pontotoc counties in 1866. 

 

Original settlement was in Carrollville...
Baldwyn is an outgrowth of the village of Carrollville _ when the Mobile and Ohio Railroad was built during the years of 1848 to 1861, it missed Carrollville by 1.5 miles and the citizens moved to the new town of Baldwyn, which was named for the civil engineer who surveyed the road through the town.  Tishomingo, chief of the Chickasaw, lived at old Carrollville but died at Little Rock, Arkansas in 1839.  The population of Baldwyn at the 1870 census was 133. 
Source: Brieger, James F., ed.(1980). Hometown Mississippi Historical and Genealogical Association of Mississippi.p.291. Jason Collum,Publisher of Baldwyn News.

Mississippi's Final Stands Interpretive Center and Battlefields

The 1400 acre Brice's Crossroads battlefield is interpreted with exhibits, videos, maps, and interactives along with the Battle of Tupelo/Harrisburg, at the Mississippi's Final Stands Interpretive Center located five miles east of the battlefield at 607 Grisham Street. Hours of Operation are Tuesday to Saturday from 9 AM to 5 PM.  Admission is $5.  Children under seven get in free.  Group tours are welcome.

For more information, contact MS Final Stands (662) 365-3969.  Visit www.finalstands.com or email bcr.edwina@gmail.com

Battle of Brice's Crossroads

Excerpt from finalstands.com/history

"These battles, fought in the summer of 1864 in Northeast Mississippi, were part of the Atlanta campaign. For Major General William T. Sherman, the fighting in Mississippi in the summer of 1864 was to protect the railroad carrying food and ammunition from Tennessee to his army advancing on Atlanta. "

Civil War Reenactment

Civil War Reenactment

Civil War Reenactment

Civil War Reenactment

Civil War Reenactment

Civil War Reenactment

Civil War Reenactment

Civil War Reenactment

Civil War Reenactment

Civil War Reenactment

Brice's Crossroads Monument

Brice's Crossroads Monument

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